netwebly guide - stuff to make you feel better
infobahn


Site Overview:

Read me
Subscribe

Site Resources:
File-Sharing
Digital Workforce

Search Engines
Web Browsers

MP3 Players

MP3 Resources
Digital Music


File-Sharing:
Napster
Gnutella
Scour Exchange

FreeNet
iMesh
CuteMx

OpenNap
Aimster

MojoNation

::::
:::: :::
::from::::
:the vault:::


MP3 Law Proposed
Napster & Democracy
Death of Web Design


Bagging on
E-Commerce Trends


:::::::::::::
::::::


The new napster

Introducing:
The MSP


Are the Users
Next?


:::



:::::
:: : : :



Channels: digital music : file sharing : gnutella: napster
subscribe4free : more news ...
archives submit story

Free DSL Access Broadband Digital/Winfire
http://www.winfire.com
posted by netwebly | spring 2000

If you think trying to read a web page plastered with high-contrast banner ads and blinking graphics is difficult, just you wait.
Winfire, formerly known as Broadband digital, one of several companies experimenting with the idea of free high-speed Internet access, was not the first company to have contemplated the idea of streaming television-quality advertisements on the web, but they are the first to actually test the waters.

The concept behind the idea has entranced Net advertising agencies for years.Bandwidth considerations have always limited what advertisers can do on the Internet, forcing most to rely on the much maligned and relatively ineffective banner ad to reach Internet users.

The growing popularity of high speed access represents the first real opportunity for advertisers and sponsors to deliver the sort of high definition advertising Americans watch every night on Network television and Cable.

Winfire, a Newport Beach, California start-up founded by Net admen Ryan and Chad Steelberg, is the first company to experiment with the idea of free dsl access, following the breakthrough success of similar free dialup services earlier this year. The company plans to offer the service to subscribers in selected markets starting this summer.

Similar programs have run into harsh criticism from both the media and privacy advocates, many of whom have predicted that consumers will get the short end of the bargain. In most cases, users must sacrifice their right to privacy as a condition of service, a tradeoff providers depict as a small price to pay for free Internet access.

Brave broadband

http://www.winfire.com

| Add URL | netwebly.com| subscribe | feedback | digital music | file sharing | gnutella | napster | archives
© the netwebly guide 2000